I love history, science, foreign policy, international news, reading, and classical, jazz and blues music.
Retired Master Plumber, retired PC technician, but still keep current, because...well...family...
Science geek, computer geek, history geek, I read everything but romance and westerns.

Sid Echikson

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Biology & Medicine | Science & Technology

Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

Common antidepressants interact with opioid med to lessen pain relief

Common antidepressants interact with the opioid pain medication tramadol to make it less effective for pain relief, according to a study from University Hospitals (UH). These findings have important implications for the opioid epidemic, suggesting that so

    Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

    The Promise and Price of Cellular Therapies | The New Yorker

    New “living drugs”—made from a patient’s own cells—can cure once incurable cancers, Siddhartha Mukherjee writes. But can we afford them?

    Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

    The battle between virus and host cell

    When viruses enter the body, such as during an influenza or a gastrointestinal infection, the processes within the infected cells change: In the worst case, the virus takes the helm and reprograms the cell to its advantage. It then produces viral componen

    Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

    Kratom herbal supplement used to treat addiction and pain found unsafe by researchers

    The herb kratom is increasingly being used to manage pain and treat opioid addiction, but it's not safe to use as an herbal supplement, according to new research led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

    Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

    Major breakthrough in the treatment of leukemia

    A molecular process involved in the action of anti-leukemia drugs has been discovered at Université de Montréal's Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer (IRIC). While calling into question a central tenet of oncology, this discovery, published

      Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

      A concussion can cost your job, especially if you are young and well educated

      A hard tackle on the football-field, a crash on your bike or a fall from a ladder in your home can easily cause a concussion, which eventually can cost your job—especially if you are in your thirties, and have a higher education.

      Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

      Adults with cerebral palsy at higher risk for osteoporosis

      (HealthDay)—Cerebral palsy (CP) is associated with an increased risk for osteoporosis and osteoarthritis, according to a study published in the August issue of Bone.

      Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

      Why plants don't die from cancer

      Chernobyl has become a byword for catastrophe. The 1986 nuclear disaster, recently brought back into the public eye by the hugely popular TV show of the same name, caused thousands of cancers, turned a once populous area into a ghost city, and resulted in

      Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

      New technique promises improved metastatic prostate cancer detection

      Prostate cancer is the second-leading cause of male cancer deaths worldwide. Deaths from prostate cancer are primarily due to metastasized cancer, in which cancer cells have migrated through the body and begun to grow in other areas. Results reported in B

      Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

      Research ties common heartburn medications to kidney disease and failure

      Common medications prescribed to treat heartburn, acid reflux and ulcers are linked to increased risks for kidney failure and chronic kidney disease, found a recent University at Buffalo study.

      Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

      The Devastating Allure of Medical Miracles | WIRED

      After sepsis forced the amputation of Sheila Advento's hands, an intricate transplant technique made her whole again. Then came the side effects.

      Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

      We may finally know what causes Alzheimer’s – and how to stop it

      Evidence is growing that a bacterium involved in gum disease causes Alzheimer's, raising hopes that a vaccine could one day prevent the disease

      Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

      Stanford study separates emotional and physical sensations of pain

      ​A new study isolated a bundle of neurons that are responsible for the negative emotional experience associated with pain. This insight into how pain is processed could lead to non-opioid treatments for chronic pain that eliminate the unpleasant feeling

      Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

      The Reservoir - bioGraphic

      In Bangladesh, a bat-borne virus you've probably never heard of is poised to become the next pandemic—and medicine alone may not be sufficient to stop it. Is an ecological intervention the answer?

      Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

      The microscopic structure of a cat’s tongue helps keep its fur clean - How cats groom themselves

      T.S. ELIOT’S mystery cat, Macavity, besides being a criminal mastermind able to evade the combined ranks of British law enforcement, had a coat that was “dusty from neglect”. Criminality is one thing, but this truly strains the imagination. Real cat

      Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

      This fix for nerve 'insulation' could prevent MS progress - Futurity

      In multiple sclerosis, the immune system damages the myelin sheaths that cover nerves. New research identifies a potential way to rebuild it.

      Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

      Leukaemia triggered by infections like flu and likely to be preventable, says leading cancer scientist in 'landmark' bre

      Most cases of childhood leukaemia are likely to be preventable and might be brought on by common infections such as flu, one of the UK’s leading cancer scientists has suggested in a breakthrough that could revolutionise treatment of the disease. Accor

      Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

      Epstein-Barr virus linked to seven serious diseases

      A far-reaching study conducted by scientists at Cincinnati Children's reports that the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)—best known for causing mononucleosis—also increases the risks for some people of developing seven other major diseases.

      Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

      Brain adapts after rare dementia attacks language center - Futurity

      "This brain compensation suggests there are opportunities to intervene and offer targeted treatment to those areas."

        Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

        How One Child’s Sickle Cell Mutation Helped Protect the World From Malaria - The New York Times

        The genetic mutation arose 7,300 years ago in just one person in West Africa, scientists reported on Thursday. Its advantage: a shield against rampant malaria.

        Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

        Cancer ‘vaccine’ eliminates tumors in mice – Science Bulletin

        Injecting minute amounts of two immune-stimulating agents directly into solid tumors in mice can eliminate all traces of cancer in the animals, including distan

        Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

        'Zombie Deer' Disease Is Spreading: What You Should Do

        Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) has now been reported in deer in at least 22 U.S. states and 2 Canadian provinces. A study has raised concerns that CWD could eventually jump to humans.

        Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

        Could 'Zombie Deer' Disease Spread to Humans?

        Deer dying from a fatal neurological disease have been found in at least 22 states in the U.S. and in parts of Canada.

          Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

          How brittlestars ‘see’ without eyes

          A starfish relative called the brittlestar lacks eyes, but it can still 'see' its environment.

          Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

          These very subtle movements line up with autism - Futurity

          Diagnosing autism is still quite subjective, but certain movements could be "biomarkers" for more objective evaluation.

          Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

          Pacific Northwest salmon are in big genetic trouble | Science | AAAS

          Researchers see dramatic decline in genetic diversity, sparking concern about the fish’s future

          Science & Technology | Biology & Medicine

          Light pollution may promote the spread of West Nile virus | Science | AAAS

          Birds exposed to dim light at night remain infectious longer, increasing the risk to wildlife and humans