#USHistory

History | History

5 Things You Might Not Know About the Battle of Midway

The mighty clash between Japanese and U.S. naval forces in June 1942 ended in a stunning—and surprising—Allied victory.

History | History

How Wild Bill Hickok Became an American Legend

Wild Bill Hickok personified the archetype of the gentleman gunfighter in the history of the American West. HowStuffWorks looks at his life and times.

History | History

Harriet Tubman's Civil War Raid | Mental Floss

With the Combahee River Raid of 1863, Harriet Tubman earned her nickname "Moses" all over again—and became the first woman in U.S. history to lead a military expedition.

History | History

Warrior in iconic Iwo Jima flag-raising photo was misidentified, Marines Corps acknowledges

The Marine Corps corrected a 74-year-old error with the announcement that a corporal from Iowa named Harold 'Pie' Keller helped raise the flag in the Iwo Jima photo, not Pfc. Rene Gagnon

History | History

Florida Man Discovers Original D-Day Audiotapes in His Basement

Bruce Campbell never expected to find some of World War II’s most important radio broadcasts buried in his cluttered basement.

History | History

The O.K. Corral: The Gunfight of All Gunfights

This Gunfight at the O.K. Corral lasted just 30 seconds. But its legend has endured for more than a decade. We dissect the battle's myth and lure.

History | History

How Different Is The U.S. From Pre-War Germany?

Is it really inconceivable for such evil to unfold here in the U.S.? Most would dismiss the question out of hand as ludicrous, arguing that we are blessed by a constitution and a politically-moderate electorate. But so was Germany – until it wasn’t.

History | History

December 1941: How did Pearl Harbor affect Hitler? The Second World War's Most Important Month

From the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor to Hitler's declaration of war on the US, historian Laurence Rees explains why December 1941 was such a significant month during World War II.

History | History

U.S. History Doesn’t Need To Be ‘Reframed’ Around Identity Politics; It Already Has Been

The myth that students and readers are getting some rose-colored version of American history is nonsense. So what is the 1619 Project really trying to do?

History | History

10 Things You May Not Know About the Jamestown Colony - HISTORY

In May of 1607, a hearty group of Englishmen arrived on the muddy shores of modern-day Virginia under orders from King James I to establish an English colony.

History | History

The race to the Moon was so unpopular at one point, President Eisenhower called JFK ‘nuts’

Enthusiasm for the Apollo program waxed and waned, and when people couldn’t see the value in it, they dubbed it a ‘Moondoggle.’

Miscellaneous | Interesting Links

George Washington's Final Years—And Sudden, Agonizing Death - HISTORY

The Founding Father left the presidency a healthy man, but then died from a sudden illness less than three years later.

History | History

The US land forever leased to England

Every May, the US Coast Guard and the Royal Navy hold a ceremony on a sliver of North Carolina land where four English World War Two soldiers are buried.

Travel | Travel

Here are 10 fascinating Revolutionary War landmarks across America

Plan a visit to these 10 Revolutionary War landmarks that are both educational and fun for folks of all ages.

Politics | Op-Ed

They Belong On the Mall: U.S. Armed Forces Are Defenders of Liberty, Not Tools of Oppression

Tanks on the Washington Mall? They aren't evidence of an impending military coup; they're a symbol of America's military and civilian awesomeness. A quick word on today's special guest star, the M1 Abrams Main Battle Tank, before we get to the really juic

History | History

Think Trump Is Ruining the Fourth of July? The Founders Couldn’t Even Agree on How to Celebrate It. - POLITICO Magazine

Thomas Jefferson used the holiday to burnish his legacy; others used it to jeer at George Washington; John Adams thought it was commemorating the wrong date.

History | History

The Lessons of the Declaration of Independence

The colonists’ quest for independence from the British in 1776 began with a goal: “to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them.” Declaring independence me

Politics | Politics

Top 9 presidential primary debate moments in US history

As the road to 2020 heats up, here are some of the most memorable moments from past primary debates – ranging from Ronald Reagan and the Clintons to Donald Trump and Joe Biden.

Politics | Leftist Lunacy

REPORT: It Will Cost $600,000 To Cover Up George Washington Mural That 'Traumatized' San Fran High School Students

It will cost a San Francisco school district more than half a million dollars to cover up a "controversial" mural of George Washington, after a handful of activists complained that the mere sight of the nation's first president was "traumat

History | History

Chasing demons: 75 years on, D-Day haunts, drives its vets

They are back, some for the first time since war stole their innocence 75 years ago on Normandy's D-Day beaches.

History | History

The 20th Century’s Most Important Day Was D-Day. This Is Why. | PragerU

On June 6, 1944, Allied forces stormed the beaches of Normandy in northern France. Their goal: to liberate Western Europe from Nazi tyranny. From a distance, it might seem that victory was pre-ordained, but no one felt that way at the time. British milita

History | History

Americans' Loss Of Interest In the Civil War Is Part Of A Disturbing Trend

In an era of historical ignorance and indifference, is it any wonder that Civil War battlefields are drawing fewer tourists?

History | History

Richard Cole, Last WWII Doolittle Raider, Dies at 103

Richard Cole, Last WWII Doolittle Raider, Dies at 103

History | History

Disney history: how has the corporation shaped our perception of the past?

Over the course of its near-100 year history Disney has repackaged, or 'Disneyfied', a number of real historical people and events. Here, historian Dr John Wills explores the real history behind six Disney films: Song of the South (1946); Davy Crockett, K

History | History

13 Facts About the War of 1812

The War of 1812 was a defining struggle for Canada, the United States, and indigenous peoples across North America.

History | History

13 Incredible Facts About Frederick Douglass | Mental Floss

The list of Frederick Douglass's accomplishments is astonishing—respected orator, famous writer, abolitionist, civil rights leader, presidential consultant—even without considering that he was a former slave with no formal education.

History | History

Marine recalls fight for Okinawa, last major battle of World War II

Charles Voland, of Independence, was wounded in one invasion and fought in another in Okinawa during World War II.

History | History

How Wild Was Wild Bill Hickok? A Biographer Separates Life From Legend

Tom Clavin’s “Wild Bill” details the life of a legendary gunfighter whose real name wasn’t even Bill.

History | History

45 Amazing Facts About All 44 American Presidents | Mental Floss

Read on to discover which American president wanted to be a concert violinist, which carried a dictionary around in his pocket, and who burned his official White House portrait.

History | History

American history myths: 7 things people get wrong

From the Salem witches who were burnt at the stake to the Declaration of Independence signed on the ‘Fourth of July’, American history is full of misconceptions and mistakes. Here, author Jem Duducu busts some of the biggest myths and separates fact f

History | History

10 Things You Might Not Know About Calvin Coolidge | Mental Floss

Test your knowledge with amazing and interesting facts, trivia, quizzes, and brain teaser games on MentalFloss.com.

History | History

5 Insane Facts From History Nobody Taught You In School | Cracked.com

It's hard to take your ancestors seriously after you realize how they all smelled.

History | History

Lincoln and Thanksgiving: The Origin of an American Holiday

The very first Thanksgiving happened almost 400 years ago—long before the nation was born. How did it evolve into America’s quintessential national holiday? Credit largely goes to two people—one, a name you know; the other, you’ve probably never h

History | History

Intense photos show the WWII Battle of Leyte Gulf — the biggest naval battle of all-time

The Battle of Leyte Gulf was a decisive Allied victory over the Japanese Navy, which unfolded over the course of three days.

History | History

8 Things to Know about Crispus Attucks. The First Man Killed In The American Revolution.

Test your knowledge with amazing and interesting facts, trivia, quizzes, and brain teaser games on MentalFloss.com.

History | History

LARRY ELDER: Slavery - What They Didn't Teach in My High School | Daily Wire

A man I have known since grade school changed his name, years ago, to an Arabic one. He told me he rejected Christianity as "the white man's religion that justified slavery." He argued Africans taken out of that continent were owed reparations.

History | History

Why the 3/5ths Compromise Was Anti-Slavery | PragerU

Is racism enshrined in the United States Constitution? How could the same Founding Fathers who endorsed the idea that all men are created equal also endorse the idea that some men are not? The answer provided in this video by Carol Swain, former professor

History | History

How a Tiny Cape Cod Town Survived World War I's Only Attack on American Soil | History | Smithsonian

A century ago, a German U-boat fired at five vessels and a Massachusetts beach before slinking back out to sea

History | History

New Discovery Could Finally Solve Creepy Mystery Of America's 'Lost Colony'

It was one of the most profound archeolgical discoveries before it was debunked. But new research may prove the authenticty once and for all.

History | History

The Science of Saving the Declaration of Independence

How science helped—and harmed—efforts to preserve the U.S.'s founding documents.

History | History

What Did the Founding Fathers Eat and Drink as They Started a Revolution?

They may not have been hosting a cookout, but they did know how to imbibe and celebrate

History | History

10 Pivotal Facts About the French and Indian War | Mental Floss

Test your knowledge with amazing and interesting facts, trivia, quizzes, and brain teaser games on MentalFloss.com.

History | History

Zora Neale Hurston's interview with one of America's last slaves

Excerpt from Barracoon: The Story of the Last “Black Cargo” by Zora Neale Hurston. In 1931, she sought to publish an important piece of American history — the story of Cudjo Lewis, the only living survivor of the final slave ship to land in America.

History | History

Why George Washington was nearly impossible to kill

He survived tuberculosis, dysentery, pneumonia, malaria, and more.

Miscellaneous | NEW YORK CITY

Take a Trip Through New York City in the Year 1911

Back in 1911, the Swedish film production company Svenska Biografteatern visited New York City during a trip to America and shot footage of various street scenes. The film has survived through the years in mint condition, and YouTuber Guy Jones created this fascinating 8-minute edit after slowing down the footage to a natural rate and adding in ambient sounds.

History | History

John W. Jones: The Runaway Slave Who Buried Nearly 3000 Confederate Soldiers

He saved lives on the Underground Railroad—then cared for the Confederate dead.

History | History

Dec. 14, 1799: The excruciating final hours of President George Washington | PBS NewsHour

It was a house call no physician would relish. On Dec. 14, 1799, three doctors were summoned to Mount Vernon in Fairfax County, Virginia to attend to a critically ill, 67-year-old man who happened to be known as “the father of our country.”

News | Interesting Links

The Secret to Henry Kissinger’s Success - POLITICO Magazine

Many think the retired diplomat’s closeness to one man—Richard Nixon—was the source of his power. That gets Kissinger dangerously wrong.

History | History

Why Did the U.S. Sink Captured Japanese Subs After WWII? | Smithsonian

WWII had come to a close, and the U.S. was the first to seize a new class of giant Japanese submarines. The next step was to analyze them quickly and then sink them, before the Russians could learn their secrets.

History | History

THE SHOT THAT ECHOES STILL

Fifty years after one lone prophet who didn’t make it to forty gave up the ghost on a bland balcony in Memphis, this essay is proof that King’s legacy, and Baldwin’s words, remain vital.

History | History

When a Jewish man was lynched for murdering a little girl, the Klan was reborn

On Thanksgiving night in 1915, Joseph Simmons and 15 men gathered at the peak of Stone Mountain, near Atlanta, Georgia. Their faces lit by a flaming cross, they declared that the Ku Klux Klan was…

History | History

In defense of Andrew Jackson

Twitter is a poor place to go if you want to understand Andrew Jackson and the sum of Native American frontier history.

History | History

Did FDR End the Great Depression? | PragerU

Did FDR help end the Great Depression? Did his New Deal improve an otherwise hopeless economy? Lee Ohanian, Professor of Economics at UCLA and consultant to the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, explains.

History | History

5 Groundbreaking Firsts That Your History Books Lied About

It turns out that a whole lot of famous firsts are credited to the wrong people, due to politics, bad luck, or outright lies.

News | In The News

The first US coin could have been held by Alexander Hamilton

Coin experts say they have found the first silver piece minted by the United States, one likely held by Alexander Hamilton himself.

History | History

How Americans Celebrated Independence Day in 1777 | Mental Floss

July 4, 1776, may not be the day the Continental Congress declared their independence from England (that would be July 2). It's not even the day that signing of the Declaration began (that would be a month later and drag on for quite some time).

History | History

The Battleship That Went from Pearl Harbor to D-Day

The D-Day landings featured an immense fleet – including seven battleships. One, HMS Rodney, was notable for being the only battleship to torpedo another battleship. However, one of the American battleships came to Normandy via Pearl Harbor, where she was run aground.

History | History

JFK’s last birthday: Gifts, champagne and wandering hands on the presidential yacht

The party aboard the Sequoia included dinner, dancing and the president's pursuit of a legendary Washington journalist's wife.

History | History

A rare copy of the Declaration of Independence has been found — in England

The only other parchment copy of the document that proclaimed the independence of America's 13 colonies is at the National Archives in Washington.

History | History

Last Doolittle Raider, 101, recalls attack 75 years later

CINCINNATI (AP) — At age 101, retired Lt. Col. Dick Cole says his memories are vivid of the Doolittle Tokyo Raiders mission that helped change the course of World War II.

History | History

Teacher traces dad's World War II past, finds 75-year-old plane wreckage

The story started to come together when Ken Elder Bledsoe organized the letters his father had written to his mother in 1942.

Miscellaneous | Interesting Links

Did William Henry Harrison Really Die of Pneumonia?

People are still torn over the belief that the ninth president died of pneumonia after not wearing a coat to his inauguration.

History | History

Posthumous honor for US officer who saved 200 Jewish GIs from the Nazis -- and never told a soul | The Times of Israel

With a Nazi pistol pointed at his head, Master Sgt. Roddie Edmonds refused to reveal which of his soldiers were Jews. This week he was recognized for his bravery

History | History

George Washington’s Tent: 5 fascinating facts you didn’t know - Curbed Philly

A team has been working for years to conserve George Washington’s tent used during the American Revolutionary War. It will be on display at the Museum of the American Revolution.

Politics | Politics

The REAL Worst. President. Ever.

People are debating who will be more disastrous for the country, Trump or Clinton. But James Buchanan takes the cake.

History | History

US Marines admit one of the men identified in Iwo Jima photo was the wrong man - as details emerge of real hero who took

The US Marines have resolved a longstanding question mark over the identities of the men in an iconic photograph from Iwo Jima, revealing the story of a Midwestern Private who went to his grave without ever claiming his role.

Politics | Donald Trump

Donald Trump has absolutely no idea what Lincoln did…

Donald Trump made the most absolutely stupendously stupid statement about what made Lincoln successful that there is no explanation other than he doesn’t have a damn clue what Lincoln did or …

History | History

Presidents Day: What you may not know - CNNPolitics.com

Retailers open their doors Monday and roll out big sales to entice customers. Government employees -- along with kids -- have the day off. But do you know why?

History | History

44 books on 44 presidents: Hitting the wall with Martin Van Buren

In which our brave reader nearly loses his damn mind reading about the eighth president of the United States.

History | History

Adams vs. Jefferson: The Birth of Negative Campaigning in the U.S.

Negative campaigning in the United States can be traced back to John Adams and Thomas Jefferson. Back in 1776, the dynamic duo combined powers to help claim America's independence, and they had nothing but love and respect for one another. But by 180

History | History

We Toured Thomas Jefferson’s Rotunda at the University of Virginia. Here’s What We Learned About Its Secrets Discove

Brian Hogg, senior historic preservation planner at the University of Virginia, thought they had discovered almost everything there was to know about the rotunda on campus, which was originally built by Thomas Jefferson who founded the university in 1819

History | History

Christopher Columbus: Hero or Villain? | National Review Online

Can we still celebrate October 12 as an American holiday? Yes.

History | History

Multimillion-dollar photo of Billy the Kid playing croquet was $2 junk shop find | US news | The Guardian

The image, unearthed in Fresno, California, is only the second confirmed picture of the outlaw – the other sold for $2.3m in 2011

History | History

6 Constitutional Amendments That Just Missed the Cut | Mental Floss

Since 1789, Congress has approved 33 constitutional amendments. Twenty-seven of those amendments were eventually ratified and became part of the Constitution. Six failed after being sent to the states. Here's the scoop on those six that didn't make the

History | History

Was it Wrong to Drop the Atom Bomb on Japan? - Prager University

In recent years, many academics and others have condemned President Truman's decision to use the atomic bomb on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki as unnecessary and immoral. Yet this interpretation relies on a poor understanding of history tha

History | History

College Board gives in and adds 'American exceptionalism' to AP U.S. history

College Board has implemented a reworking of the AP U.S. History course curriculum to include "American exceptionalism."

History | History

The Declaration of Independence: Six lesser-known facts - CNN.com

This Fourth of July will mark the 239th anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. Here are some lesser-known facts about the document.

Politics | PC Culture

Confederate Flags Removed From Fort Sumter: Site Where Civil War Began - Breitbart

Confederate flags have been removed from South Carolina’s Fort Sumter per a National Park Service directive barring Confederate flags in “units of the National Park system and related sites” with few exceptions.

History | History

Betsy Ross Probably Didn't Sew the First Flag | Mental Floss

In honor of Flag Day, we thought it was time you knew the truth: Everything you know about how the stars and stripes came to be crafted may be a lie.

History | History

How early 20th century America played and worked, in color

These Autochromes - the first commercially available color photographic process - were taken by National Geographic Society photographers. The Society eventually moved on to other slightly more advanced photographic processes and finally to Kodachrome by 1938, but not before amassing a collection of more than 12,000 Autochromes.

History | History

The Truth about the Vietnam War - Prager University

Did the United States win or lose the Vietnam War? We are taught that it was a resounding loss for America, one that proves that intervening in the affairs of other nations is usually misguided. The truth is that our military won the war, but our politici