#history

Miscellaneous | NEW YORK CITY

Take a Trip Through New York City in the Year 1911

Back in 1911, the Swedish film production company Svenska Biografteatern visited New York City during a trip to America and shot footage of various street scenes. The film has survived through the years in mint condition, and YouTuber Guy Jones created this fascinating 8-minute edit after slowing down the footage to a natural rate and adding in ambient sounds.

News | Interesting Links

Egyptians: Scanning the Pharaohs

Zahi Hawass Sahar N. Saleem The American University in Cairo Press Cairo, New York 2016 ISBN 978 977 416 673 0 I was thrilled whe...

News | Human Interest Stories

NEVER AGAIN? On Yom Hashoah, Poll Shows Two Thirds Of Millennials Don't Know What Auschwitz Was

According to a new survey released on Thursday by the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, fully 41 percent of Americans don’t know what Auschwitz was, including two-thirds of Mil

History | History

How Soviet troops taunted the Nazis during their final drive to Berlin in World War II

Amid the chaos and destruction in Germany during the final days of World War II, Soviet forces found other, nonmilitary ways to torment their foes.

Music | Music

The Very Black History Of Punk Music|

The Very Black History Of Punk Music| #PunkRock #Racism #History

News | In The News

When I Met Martin Luther King, Jr.

I will always remember that moment and what it taught me about Dr. King and one of his core values: humility.

History | History

Pollak: American History, the Passover Way | Breitbart

Imagine if we Americans learned history the Passover way -- not as something that happened in the past, but as an experience we ourselves lived through.

Politics | Politics

JFK may have been a worse philanderer than Trump. Does it matter?

Like Trump, JFK's inability to resist the allure of an adult entertainer indicates a much deeper character issue. And yet a romanticized image of him survives.

Politics | Politics

If the Second Amendment falls, our entire Bill of Rights falls

The startling new proposal by 97-year-old former Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens calling for the repeal of the Second Amendment to our Constitution’s Bill of Rights is unwise, dangerous and totally unrealistic.

History | History

6 nations that had no problems invading Russia in the winter

If there’s one generally accepted rule of warfare, it’s that you should never invade Russia during the winter.

Food & Drink | Food

Stepping Back in Time at Rae’s – Palisades News

By Bob Vickrey Special to the Palisades News You’ve driven by it numerous times on Pico Boulevard, but like most Westsiders, you’ve probably never considered stopping for a meal at this old-fashion…

History | History

John W. Jones: The Runaway Slave Who Buried Nearly 3000 Confederate Soldiers

He saved lives on the Underground Railroad—then cared for the Confederate dead.

News | Interesting Stories

One JFK conspiracy theory that could be true - CNN

An expert weighs in on several conspiracy theories surrounding the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

History | History

Have we really found Amelia Earhart's bones? | Science | The Guardian

A new study claims that the Nikumaroro Island bones are those of the famous aviator. But some researchers remain skeptical

News | Interesting Links

World’s First Computer Programmer - Business Insider

Ada Lovelace may not be a household name like Steve Jobs but she is possibly the first computer programmer.

History | History

The Nazis fooled the world for 16 days in 1936—and we’re allowing it to happen again

It's worth remembering today, after North Korea's appearance at the Olympics, and as Russia and Qatar gear up for the World Cup.

Family & Parenting | Kids

Toys 'R' Us will close or sell all US stores

Toys 'R' Us hoped to use bankruptcy proceedings to help the company turn around.

Health & Fitness | Health

Spanish flu: the virus that changed the world - History Extra

In spring 1918 a disease began to sweep around the planet – a lethal virus that infected a third of the world's population and left upwards of 50 million dead. Laura Spinney explores the devastating impact and far-reaching legacy of the Spanish flu pand

News | Interesting Links

There’s one hero of Entebbe who deserves his own film. I remember him well | World news | The Guardian

Michel Cojot-Goldberg acted as the translator for Uganda’s president Idi Amin and as the go-between for the hijackers and passengers

History | History

A plane found 38 feet under the ice: A Daring, High-Risk Rescue Attempt In Greenland In 1942 Has Come To Light Again

There are no shortage of memorable moments that unfolded during the Second World War. And though many of us would choose not to remember all of them, it’s important to keep them in mind; to not only pay homage to those we’ve lost but to learn from ou

Miscellaneous | Interesting Links

19 Things You Might Not Know Were Invented by Women

Necessity isn't the only mother of invention. Though it wasn't always easy to get patents or the credit they deserved, women are responsible for many items we use today.

News | Interesting Stories

Amelia Earhart mystery solved? Scientist '99 percent' sure bones found belong to aviator | Fox News

A scientific study claims to shed new light on the decades-long mystery of what happened to Amelia Earhart.

History | History

Wreckage found of WWII aircraft carrier USS Lexington

Wreckage from the USS Lexington, a US aircraft carrier which sank during World War II, has been found in the Coral Sea, a search team led by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen announced Monday. The search team released pictures and video of the wreckage of

Visual Arts | Architecture

With Home Savings, financier teamed with Millard Sheets for added currency

A new book explores the architecture of Sheets, especially in Home Savings thrifts.

Food & Drink | Bars/Restaurants/Venues

Future uncertain for Red Fox Room

The bar-restaurant combo unabashedly calls itself “an undeniable city icon” on its website. However, its historic run may be coming to an end.

Science & Technology | Cool Stuff

New dinosaurs are being discovered in record numbers, and it’s changing everything we thought we knew – BGR

Every kid grows up loving dinosaurs. As we grow older we listen to science teachers explain how dinosaurs lived and died, we watch documentaries about the age when reptiles ruled the land, and by the time we reach adulthood most of us like to think we hav

History | History

Dec. 14, 1799: The excruciating final hours of President George Washington | PBS NewsHour

It was a house call no physician would relish. On Dec. 14, 1799, three doctors were summoned to Mount Vernon in Fairfax County, Virginia to attend to a critically ill, 67-year-old man who happened to be known as “the father of our country.”

Science & Technology | Archaeology & Anthropology

The Thistlegorm Project | 3D Survey and 360 Videos

An archaeological survey of the SS Thistlegorm shipwreck in the Red Sea, Egypt. Featuring 3D photogrammetry and 360 degree underwater video.

Science & Technology | Paleontology

Prehistoric spider-like arachnid found preserved in amber, and it even has a tail – BGR

If you're one of the many people who have a fear of spiders, going back in time 100 million years apparently wouldn't have done you any good. A new, bizarre spider-like creature has just been discovered in Southeast Asia, having been encased in amber duri

Music | Music

How L.A. Punks of the '80s and '90s Kept Neo-Nazis Out of Their Scene - Los Angeles Magazine

John Doe and other insiders from the era reflect on what worked then—and what we can learn today

Sports | Cycling

Hollywood Behind Handlebars - Los Angeles Magazine

Hitting the trail with yesteryear’s celebrity cyclists

History | History

10 Huge Misconceptions About Famous Medieval Figures

Renaissance thinkers didn’t heap much praise on the Middle Ages, but the period is full of inspiring figures who performed …

Entertainment | Humor

History of Jewish humor in America.

This Pin was discovered by Chris Thomas. Discover (and save!) your own Pins on Pinterest.

News | Interesting Links

The Secret to Henry Kissinger’s Success - POLITICO Magazine

Many think the retired diplomat’s closeness to one man—Richard Nixon—was the source of his power. That gets Kissinger dangerously wrong.

Science & Technology | Physics & Cosmology

The Three Meanings Of E=mc^2, Einstein's Most Famous Equation

From matter, antimatter and energy to the fundamental truths about existence, Einstein's most famous equation is the link you can't forget.

History | HISTORY

Why this Holocaust survivor still wears his concentration camp uniform | New York Post

Ed Mosberg’s hands stay steady as he slips into the striped cotton jacket and matching cap — an outfit identical to one he was issued 75 years ago, as a...

History | History

Why Did the U.S. Sink Captured Japanese Subs After WWII? | Smithsonian

WWII had come to a close, and the U.S. was the first to seize a new class of giant Japanese submarines. The next step was to analyze them quickly and then sink them, before the Russians could learn their secrets.

Science & Technology | Archaeology & Anthropology

Cahokia: North America's First City

Cahokia was one of the largest cities in the world hundreds of years before Columbus. But by 1400 A.D., it had been abandoned.

News | Interesting Links

Death as Entertainment at the Paris Morgue - Atlas Obscura

In the late 19th century, tourists flocked to see bodies and guess how they got there.

History | History

THE SHOT THAT ECHOES STILL

Fifty years after one lone prophet who didn’t make it to forty gave up the ghost on a bland balcony in Memphis, this essay is proof that King’s legacy, and Baldwin’s words, remain vital.

Science & Technology | Science & Space

How John Young Smuggled a Corned-Beef Sandwich into Space

NASA astronaut John Young, who died Jan. 5, is remembered for a small scandal after he smuggled a corned-beef sandwich into space.

History | History

8 Amazing Things Discovered During the Expansion of the London Underground

Europe’s largest engineering project uncovered countless historic treasures, ranging from bones to Tudor bowling balls.

History | History

When a Jewish man was lynched for murdering a little girl, the Klan was reborn

On Thanksgiving night in 1915, Joseph Simmons and 15 men gathered at the peak of Stone Mountain, near Atlanta, Georgia. Their faces lit by a flaming cross, they declared that the Ku Klux Klan was…

Sports | Cycling

Vintage Schwinn Bikes - The guide to old Schwinns

Vintage Schwinn bikes. Detailed information and images about each Schwinn bike model.

History | History

WWI Centennial: An Overview

Catch up with the major turning points of World War I as the final climactic year gets underway.

Sports | Cycling

The incredible story of Italian cyclist Gino Bartali, who risked his life to rescue Jews during the Holocaust

The legendary three-time winner of the Giro d'Italia eluded Nazis by smuggling false documents in the frame of his bike during training runs.

Sports | Surfing/SUPing

Bruce Brown, who turned surfing into a cultural phenomenon with 'The Endless Summer,' dies at 80

Bruce Brown, a pioneering filmmaker whose story of two surfers chasing after the perfect wave in "The Endless Summer" helped introduce America to surfing, has died.

Entertainment | Entertainment News!

The Crown: What Really Happened When Queen Elizabeth Met John and Jackie Kennedy | Vanity Fair

In The Crown’s second season, Queen Elizabeth catches wind of Jackie Kennedy’s unflattering remarks about her and Buckingham Palace.

History | History

The Crown: The Scandal That Rocked Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip’s Marriage | Vanity Fair

When Eileen Parker sued for divorce from Prince Philip’s best friend and equerry Michael Parker, a royal scandal erupted. And Queen Elizabeth, according to frenzied news reports, was none too pleased.

History | History

The Secret World War II History Hidden in London's Fences

London's housing developments often feature a unique form of fencing: stretchers reused after World War II.

History | History

"Darkest Hour' - Churchill’s powerful ‘fight on the beaches’ speech: The words few people actually heard

As the 'Darkest Hour' debuts in movie theaters, the strange story of how people finally got to listen to Churchill deliver one of history's most stirring speeches.

Pets & Animals | Animals

New marsupial lion species discovered

AUSTRALIAN researchers have discovered a new species of extinct marsupial lion that once roamed the continent.

Music | Music

Goth So White? | Black representation in the Post-Punk scene

Before post-punk and Goth in the early days of Punk, British film director, DJ and musician Don Letts pretty much ran the scene at The Roxy in London, spinning primarily reggae…

Music | Music

KEXP Exclusive Interview: Richard Lloyd of Television

by Annie Zaleski Legendary Television guitarist Richard Lloyd says in the prologue of Everything Is Combustible that his new book is a "memoir — not an

Music | Music

New York Punk, Out of Retirement

Rockers from the downtown scene of the 1970s and ’80s are keeping the flame alive, and their gray-haired fans are happy to party like it’s 1979.

History | History

In defense of Andrew Jackson

Twitter is a poor place to go if you want to understand Andrew Jackson and the sum of Native American frontier history.

News | Israel & The Jewish Community

Yes, Ashkenazi Jews (Including Gal Gadot) Are People of Color | Dani Ishai Behan | The Blogs | The Times of Israel

Edit: thank you all for your constructive feedback. My response can be found here. Edit #2: my response to......

History | History

JFK's assassination aided by his bad back, records show - CNN

President Kennedy's lifelong struggle with back pain may have kept him from recoiling from Lee Harvey Oswald's first bullet, setting him up for the kill shot.

News | Israel & The Jewish Community

102-year-old Holocaust survivor reunites with newly discovered nephew | The Times of Israel

Eliahu Pietruszka believed his brother, who escaped Warsaw ghetto, had died in a Russian labor camp, but, generations later, a Yad Vashem genealogy project led to incredible news

History | History

Battle of Tarawa in WWII 'the toughest battle in Marine Corps history' - Business Insider

The commander of the task force attacking Tarawa called Betio "a little Gibraltar" and said that "only the Marines could have made such a landing."

Miscellaneous | Interesting Links!

What's the Truth About the First Thanksgiving?

Should Americans celebrate Thanksgiving as a day of gratitude? Or should they mourn it as a day of guilt? Michael Medved, author of The American Miracle, shares the fascinating story of the first Thanksgiving.

Sports | Surfing/SUPing

The complicated history of surfing - Scott Laderman

Today, surfing is a multi-billion-dollar global industry, with tens of millions of enthusiasts worldwide. For some it’s a serious sport; for others, just a way to let loose. But despite its casual association with fun and sun, surfing has a richer and d

Music | Music

A 70s Photographer Unveils the Ultimate New York Punk Archive on Instagram

Julia Gorton took epic Polaroids of Television, Blondie, Lydia Lunch, and more, and now she’s rolling out her collection on Instagram.

History | History

First World War composite photos bring past to life | The Week UK

Then-and-now images put snapshots of the Great War in a 21st century setting

Politics | Politics

New batch of JFK documents released

The National Archives released 13,213 more documents related to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy

Science & Technology | Cool Stuff

Mysterious void in Great Pyramid of Giza could finally reveal how pyramids were built

A mysterious void has been discovered in the Great Pyramid of Giza and Egyptologists believe it could finally shed light on how the ancient tombs were constructed. The enigmatic gap, which is around 100ft long is situated directly above the Grand Gallery,

Politics | Politics

JFK assassination documents released

A long-secret tranche of government documents pertaining to the JFK assassination is being released

Politics | Resources

Why Is Pakistan More Legitimate than Israel?

Whenever I have received a call from a listener to my radio show challenging Israel’s legitimacy, I have asked these people if they ever called a radio show to challenge any other country’s legitimacy. In particular, I ask, have they ever questioned t

Science & Technology | Cool Stuff

How the Soviet Concorde crashed and burned

With just 55 completed flights and two fatal crashes, the Concorde's Soviet rival, Tupolev Tu-144, was one of civil aviation's biggest failures.

History | History

Did FDR End the Great Depression? | PragerU

Did FDR help end the Great Depression? Did his New Deal improve an otherwise hopeless economy? Lee Ohanian, Professor of Economics at UCLA and consultant to the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, explains.

History | History

Auschwitz-Birkenau: 4 out of 10 German students don′t know what it was | News | DW | 28.09.2017

Just 47 percent of 14- to 16-year-olds in Germany know that Auschwitz-Birkenau was a Nazi death camp, a survey shows. Its authors cite fewer history lessons as a reason.

History | History

Reconstructed Auschwitz prisoner text details ′unimaginable′ suffering | Germany | DW | 09.10.2017

A newly reconstructed document written in 1944 by a Greek Jewish prisoner at Auschwitz tells of misery "the human mind can not imagine." The text was discovered buried in the ground at the Nazi extermination camp.

Politics | Op-Ed

Why ‘Indigenous Peoples' Day’ Is Far Worse Than Columbus Day

If we really want to commemorate horrifying, unspeakable violence and oppression in the Americas, I’ve got the perfect holiday: ‘Indigenous Peoples' Day.’

Politics | Op-Ed

Robin Smith: Why Columbus Day Is Worth Celebrating

But if you live in any number of “enlightened” progressive cities, today is “Indigenous Peoples’ Day.”

Food & Drink | Bars/Restaurants/Venues

Do You Remember These 15 Defunct Restaurant Chains?

Pull up a seat, open the menu, and let's look at some defunct restaurant chains you might not even remember.

Sports | Cycling

HISTORY OF MONGOOSE: Know Your Roots

http://www.stuntabiker.com History Of Mongoose: Know Your Roots. Another major BMX history lesson via Mark "Lungmustard" Eaton and Bang! Pictures and DH Prod...

History | History

5 Groundbreaking Firsts That Your History Books Lied About

It turns out that a whole lot of famous firsts are credited to the wrong people, due to politics, bad luck, or outright lies.

History | History

This woman’s portraits of wartime Greyhound passengers reveal faces of fatigue and resolve

World War II must have been exhausting, even on the home front. Beside the stress of waiting for loved ones to return from overseas, training for new jobs, or being forcibly detained, Americans were…

Science & Technology | Technology

The iPhone 10 years in: Everything that's changed from 2007 to 2017

News, email and search are just the beginning. Discover more every day. Find your yodel.

Politics | Resources

The video that makes anti-Zionists sorry they ever opened their mouths – Israel Video Network

Today the world wants to claim that anti-Zionism is NOT anti-Semitism.

WRONG.

It is anti-Semitism, and this video lays out why.

News | That's News to Me

New mummies discovered in tomb near Luxor, Egypt

The tomb, found by archaeologists near the city of Luxor, belonged to a goldsmith.

History | History

Abba Kovner and Resistance in the Vilna Ghetto

Abba Kovner led resistance fighters in both the Vilna Ghetto and in the Rudninkai Forest against the murderous Nazi enemy during the Holocaust

News | Interesting Stories

Girl Pulls Sword From Legendary Lake Of King Arthur's Excalibur

England’s got a new Queen ― that is, if Excalibur’s legend is true.

History | History

Do We Actually Know What Shakespeare Looked Like? | Mental Floss

Test your knowledge with amazing and interesting facts, trivia, quizzes, and brain teaser games on MentalFloss.com.

Entertainment | Culture/Art/Random cool stuff

The Reef Lounge - John McGehee

When I was a boy, I saw the most outlandish scene at the Handerly Hotel & Resort (formerly the Stardust Motor Hotel) in San Diego

Miscellaneous | Mid Century

Photographer Compares 1960s Postcards Vs. How These Places Look Today, And The Difference Is Unbelievable | Bored Panda

Not long ago an old matchbook laying on photographer Pablo Iglesias Maurer's desk caught his eye. Or rather, it was the postcard-like picture on it, of a resort

Style & Fashion | Fashion & Beauty

Fast Fashion’s Surprising Origins - Racked

Both the high-low collab and ultra-efficient manufacturing were born out of WWII-era austerity.

Miscellaneous | Random shit

LOONEY TUNES (Looney Toons): Hollywood Steps Out (1941) [ULTRA HD 4K Remastered]

This video streams up to Ultra HD 4k (2160p). Hollywood Steps Out is a 1941 short Merrie Melodies cartoon by Warner Bros., directed by Tex Avery. The cartoon...

Miscellaneous | Fun Stuff

How Superman Helped Foil the KKK | Mental Floss

Test your knowledge with amazing and interesting facts, trivia, quizzes, and brain teaser games on MentalFloss.com.

News | That's News to Me

Billionaire Paul Allen Finds Lost World War II Cruiser USS Indianapolis in Philippine Sea

Seventy-two years after two torpedoes fired from a Japanese submarine sunk cruiser USS Indianapolis (CA-35), the ship’s wreckage was found resting on the seafloor on Saturday – more than 18,000 feet below the Pacific Ocean’s surface. Paul Allen, Mic

Entertainment | Entertainment

Remembering the King: Elvis Presley died 40 years ago today

Presley was just 42 years old when he passed away at his Graceland mansion in Memphis, Tennessee, from a heart attack. Presley was the first rock 'n' roll superstar, whose charisma, energetic music and good looks helped make him one of the most influenti

Music | Music

New film documents the rise of East Bay punk rock

The new documentary film ‘Turn It Around’ chronicles the early days of Bay Area punk rock.

Visual Arts | History

'Rumble' Celebrates Rock 'N' Roll's Native American Roots

The documentary discusses Link Wray, Jimi Hendrix and other Native American artists who helped shape rock's sound. Guitarist and executive producer Stevie Salas says it's "a film about heroes."

Sports | Cycling

Vintage: Chicago's cycling craze -- Chicago Tribune

It was 1896, the pinnacle of America's first cycling craze, and Chicago was caught up in the excitement over these new "noiseless steeds." Then as now, bicycles jostled with other modes of transportation, vying for supremacy.

News | Interesting Stories

Archaeological find in Jerusalem ‘proves Bible passage is historically true’

Archaeologists excavating in Jerusalem have found burned artifacts dating from 2,600 years ago – which prove that a passage in the Bible is true. Researchers uncovered charred wood, grape seeds, fish scales, bones and pottery while digging in the City o

Sports | Cycling

America’s Short, Violent Love Affair With Indoor Track Cycling

A fun Friday night once meant going to the velodrome to watch cyclists collide.

Entertainment | Culture/Art/Random cool stuff

Classic San Diego Tiki - ClassicSanDiego.com

Polynesian-themed restaurants and tiki bars from the San Diego area’s past and present. How many of theses classic San Diego tiki joints do you know?

History | History

Coca-Cola collaborated with the Nazis in the 1930s, and Fanta is the proof

The not-so-sweet history

News | In The News

The first US coin could have been held by Alexander Hamilton

Coin experts say they have found the first silver piece minted by the United States, one likely held by Alexander Hamilton himself.

History | History

Jewish high jumper barred from 1936 Olympics dies at 103

Margaret Lambert, a Jewish high jumper who was barred from competing at the 1936 Olympics, has died at the age of 103.

Music | Music News

The Beatles' accountant 50 years on: 'They were scruffy boys who didn't want to pay tax'

In The Beatles’ 1966 song Taxman, George Harrison berates Harold Wilson’s proposed 95pc “supertax” on the UK’s highest earners.

History | HISTORY

‘Dunkirk’: Why Didn’t Hitler Go in For the Kill?

The British army was in full retreat, but suddenly German tanks were halted–twice. Hitler later said he gave Churchill “a sporting chance” of survival. Churchill wasn’t interested.

Miscellaneous | Interesting Links

5 weird, and very expensive, space artifacts sold at auction

A space history auction on the anniversary of the Apollo 11 landing fetched boatloads of cash. Here are some of the strangest items sold.

Politics | The Hall of Idiots

USA Today Complains About Lack of 'Women' and 'No Lead Actors of Color' in Movie 'Dunkirk' | Daily Wire

USA Today's Brian Truitt describes himself as a "shameless geek," but oddly enough omits the fact that he is also just as shamelessly ignorant when it comes to the signaling of his own CorrectThink virtue.

Science & Technology | Cool Stuff

Archaeologists go high-tech in 2,500-year-old Greek cold case

More than 2,500 years ago, an Athenian nobleman named Cylon -- the first recorded Olympic champion -- tried to take over the city of Athens and install himself as its sole ruler. According to Thucydides and Herodotus, Athenian and Greek historians who wro

Miscellaneous | Local Flavor

How Baxter Became One of L.A.’s Steepest Streets

With its 32 percent grade, how did Baxter Street ever get built?

History | History

Newly discovered photo suggests Amelia Earhart survived crash-landing

The photo, found in the National Archives, shows a woman who resembles famed aviator Amelia Earhart and a man who appears to be her navigator, Fred Noonan.

History | History

How Americans Celebrated Independence Day in 1777 | Mental Floss

July 4, 1776, may not be the day the Continental Congress declared their independence from England (that would be July 2). It's not even the day that signing of the Declaration began (that would be a month later and drag on for quite some time).

Travel | Travel

An old relic of the American road trip is disappearing - Business Insider

After its heyday in the mid-20th century, the traditional mom and pop motel has largely slipped from the public imagination.

Miscellaneous | Local Flavor

How Sepulveda Canyon Became the 405

L.A.'s most hated stretch of freeway began as a bucolic country road through the Santa Monica Mountains.

Science & Technology | Technology

Watch a former Apple guru tell the secret story of how the iPhone was invented

The iPhone is the one device that revolutionized the smartphone industry, helping make Apple the most valuable company in the world and killing off many of the early smartphone leaders like Nokia, Palm, and BlackBerry.

Miscellaneous | Disneyland History

Disneyland In The Summer of 1957: Bernie McCormick Reflects on the Most Magical Place on Earth

There was Disneyland in California. The author recalls the early years of the original Disney theme park.

History | History

The Battleship That Went from Pearl Harbor to D-Day

The D-Day landings featured an immense fleet – including seven battleships. One, HMS Rodney, was notable for being the only battleship to torpedo another battleship. However, one of the American battleships came to Normandy via Pearl Harbor, where she was run aground.

History | Southern California

When Knott’s Berry Farm Was an Actual Farm | KCET

The Orange County amusement park started as a roadside fruit stand.

History | History

23 Of The Oldest Color Photos Ever Taken

Here's what the world looked like in color, over 100 years ago.

History | History

In film, survivor searches for US soldier who liberated him at Dachau | The Times of Israel

New documentary centers on Steve Ross, who was 'transformed' as a boy by an act of kindness in the concentration camp

History | History

Catching Up With (A Real Life) "Rosie The Riveter"

Seventy-five years ago, during World War II, Dr. Frances Carter worked in a Birmingham, Alabama, defense plant, helping to build B-29 bombers—some of the largest aircraft in service during the war. She is "Rosie the Riveter," and today, we're catch

History | History

Why Colorizing Old Photos Requires a Ton of Research

Artists go out of their way to make the recreations authentic.

Politics | Politics

Obama has no shame

Obama can bask in self-delusion and embrace the collective amnesia of his pious followers, but the rest of us can only hope that today's leaders do a better job than he did.

History | History

JFK’s last birthday: Gifts, champagne and wandering hands on the presidential yacht

The party aboard the Sequoia included dinner, dancing and the president's pursuit of a legendary Washington journalist's wife.

History | History

7 of the craziest commando missions of World War II

World War II was an exciting time for special operations and commandos. The advent of airborne operations gave them a whole new angle of approach, and the sheer scale of the war guaranteed that they’d have plenty of chances to use their skills.

History | History

Look Inside the Sketchbook of a World War II Soldier

After serving in the Army, Victor Lundy went on to become a successful architect.

Music | Music

The genesis of punk rock.

Punk rock is considered a product of the ’70s, when bands like the Ramones, the Sex Pistols and the Clash propelled the style into the mainstream. But punk really has its roots in the early ’60s, when three chord bashers with attitude first establishe

Miscellaneous | Interesting Links

Mystery solved: Remains of girl in forgotten casket was daughter of prominent San Francisco family

The mystery surrounding the identity of a girl found in a century-old casket in San Francisco has been solved.

History | HISTORY

Think you’re living in a ‘hellhole’ today? Try being a billionaire in 1916. - The Washington Post

It was a much harsher world, no matter how much money you had.

Entertainment | Entertain Me

The Nintendo PlayStation is real, and now it’s fully operational

Two years ago, one of gaming’s greatest myths became a reality when a man named Terry Diebold unearthed the world’s only known prototype of the “Nintendo-PlayStation.” A Sony-created and branded machine, it was a hybrid Super NES that came with a

Entertainment | The Hometown

When L.A. Was Empty: Wide-Open SoCal Landscapes

Early photographs of Los Angeles surprise for many reasons, but often what's most striking is how empty the city looks.